(via phynali)

nodaybuttodaytodefygravity:

gr4y-cl0uds:

itsflooo:

nateriot:

Obama on gay adoption 

You the man

fucking beautiful


yeah totally ruining this country what a horrible guy

nodaybuttodaytodefygravity:

gr4y-cl0uds:

itsflooo:

nateriot:

Obama on gay adoption 

You the man

fucking beautiful

image

yeah totally ruining this country what a horrible guy

(via yer-a-blizzard-harreh)

Why is it that you can still end up with a tan even if you follow all sunscreen application rules? Does a tan expose you to skin cancer despite sunscreen?

Tanning is what you want, and sunscreen is designed to allow you to tan without burning.

To be sure, a tan is a result of some slight damage to the skin, but nothing that can’t easily be naturally repaired (unless it actually burns). Your body notices this damage, and so it produces extra melanin, which is what turns your skin brown. This extra melanin, though, protects you from further damage to the skin; it’s your body’s natural defence. This is what you want to happen, because it makes sunburn less likely. Not impossible, though, so you should still use sunscreen even if you have a very dark tan.

The risk of skin cancer is much higher if you let your skin burn. By the sound of it, your sunscreen is doing exactly what it’s supposed to do: allowing just enough UV through to give you a nice protective tan, but not enough to burn your skin. Perfect.

Do be careful, though, of another risk: sunstroke. This is unrelated to tanning and is caused by heat and dehydration. If you’re out in the hot sun a lot, make sure you drink plenty, wear loose-fitting clothes and preferably a wide-brimmed hat.

/u/rewboss

(via sdsimple)

In my dermatology class (from Pharmacy), we learned something quite different.

This is incorrect. Health-wise, you technically shouldn’t be “tanning” as this is still damaging your skin and putting you at risk for skin cancer. It is true that lighter skin has higher risk of skin cancer than dark skin is because yes, melanin protects you from skin cancer. The fairer skin you have, the higher your risk of skin cancer. And the easier you burn, the higher at risk you are for developing skin cancer.

Skin cancer results from cumulative UV exposure. So if you don’t wear sun protection because you don’t “burn”, the UV exposure can still definitely cause skin cancer! 

Sunscreen allows protection from UV light, and UV light is what damages DNA to cause cancer, and UV light is also what stimulates the melanin for the tan color, therefore tan is still sun damage.

Another thing to note is that thickness of the sunscreen application alters the actual spf of a product. SPF testing standard = 2 mg/cm2, most individuals = 0.5 – 1.5 mg/cm2) So chances are, most of you aren’t applying enough sunscreen and aren’t getting the SPF needed. 

Most important thing is to apply sunscreen very liberally and often and use spf 30 or higher, and for the love of god DO NOT USE TANNING BEDS

TL;DR: 
UV light is what causes damage to the skin, in short term causing tans and burns, long term causing skin cancer. Damage to the skin through sun exposure builds up over time, and yes, a tan can skill expose you to skin cancer because you are being exposed to UV light

Why can some Autistic people can have enhanced skills like drawing or memory?

Observers have found that the incredible skills of many “savants” reflect an incredible amount of time spent obsessively practicing or memorizing one thing—-like say the calendar—-allowing them to perform impressive feats—-like telling you the day of the week for any date within 1000 years almost instantly.

But, there’s another aspect to some Autistic savants. Researchers have found that some savants have reduced activity in the parts of the fore-brain that are responsible for what we usually think of as information processing—-basically the part of the brain that packages information in a way we understand.

In you, presumably, this part of the brain takes a bunch of lines drawn on a piece of paper and tells you that it’s, say, a house. If you wanted to draw it later, this part of your brain would remember “house” and then try to rebuild the lines from that memory, plus the sensory memories that accompanied it. This is why most people’s drawings of a house are house-like, but hardly photo realistic.

In the savant, that first step is suppressed. So they see the lines, but they don’t remember it as “house,” they remember it as “bunch of lines.” So, later, when they try to draw it, there’s no interference from this organizing principle. They just reproduce the lines, sometimes in an order that would make no sense to a non-savant (part of the roof, than a corner of a window, then the top half of the door), and can reproduce it with startling accuracy.

The same thing can happen with numbers, allowing for really fast calculation since they don’t have to stop and consider the numbers as “numbers,” but just run the operations directly.

Again, this isn’t super common. And I don’t know how widely accepted this explanation is, but I’ve always found it nifty.

/u/ohohohohohiknowthis1

(via sdsimple)

(via brotips)

lumos5000:

theshirelock:

if artistic people are forced to take years of math and science then why don’t sciencey people have to take art and music classes

someone found a real life plot hole

we do…

in university you have to take a certain amount of non-sciency courses in order to graduate. And if I remember, High School also required you to do the same (ie. option or language courses). I’m a sciency person and I was horrible at English/History but I still had to take it. 

(via yer-a-blizzard-harreh)

who-let-the-daleks-out:

thenerdgirlcometh:

I actually believe artists and scientists think very similarly. Complex, abstract thought? They both have that down. It’s all about where that thinking takes you after that.

Words cannot describe how much I love this post.

(via ridejumpfly)

His username is Bucky. His password is also Bucky. — Natasha Romanov, on Steve Rogers in the 21st century. (via hellotailor)

(via yer-a-blizzard-harreh)

i-refuse-to-stop-dreaming:

This is the best thing I’ve heard all day

i-refuse-to-stop-dreaming:

This is the best thing I’ve heard all day

(via thehilariousblog)